My Thoughts on Carrie Fisher’s Prozac Shaped Urn

Deana, a university student going through life's ups and downs! She enjoys being active, and going shopping, and also loves volunteering with mindyourmind!

A few weeks ago the world said good bye to Carrie Fisher, better known to many as Princess Leia in the Star Wars films.

On January 5th the family held a private memorial for Carrie. She was laid to rest and some of her ashes were buried with her mother, Debbie Reynolds the following day.

In the days following their memorials, photos and stories surfaced detailing that Carrie was cremated at her request- not uncommon however something was unique. Carrie’s ashes were placed in what her brother Todd called her “prized possession”- a porcelain Prozac shaped pill.

Aside from her well known acting career, Carrie was a tireless advocate for mental illness and addiction- sharing her struggles with bipolar disorder and substance abuse. After her mother’s memorial, Todd Fisher, Carrie’s brother was seen carrying what appeared to be a large Prozac pill. This was quickly picked up by both entertainment and mainstream media.

It caught my attention too- like many others. As media inquired, Todd Fisher shared that “…. Billie and I felt it was where she'd want to be.” (http://www.etonline.com/news/206655_carrie_fisher_giant_prozac_pill_urn_explained_by_brother_todd_after_debbie_reynold_funeral/)

As photos and stories of Carrie’s urn circulated, I reflected.

  • Carrie’s family honoured her struggle with mental illness and addiction as they laid her to rest

  • they recognized her passion for mental illness

  • hey shared Carrie’s message that taking medication for mental illness is okay and that it is nothing to be ashamed of

  • they started a conversation

Carrie’s family was able to ignite a conversation regarding mental illness when experiencing not one but two deaths in the family. Something so difficult in an already difficult time.

So thank you to Carrie’s family for doing something bold, something different to honour Carrie and taking her message regarding mental illness to the very end of her life. We are thinking of all of you during this difficult time.

Photo found online from CinemaBlend

Leave a Reply

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.